Television·Documentary

Secrets of the Royal Babies

The extraordinary tales of Royal births, motherhood and infancy as Prince Harry and Meghan become parents. Now streaming.
Secrets of the Royal Babies tells the extraordinary tales of Royal births, motherhood and infancy that have paved the way to this day and asks what the Duchess of Sussex might reasonably expect from this next stage of her life. 1:54

Watch the full documentary on CBC Gem now.

Prince Harry ripped up the royal rule book by marrying Meghan Markle – and it wasn't long before the media speculated when news of a new royal baby would be announced. Now the Duke and Duchess of Sussex have welcomed their first child.

Kent Gavin was the royal photographer during Prince William's christening, a great event to photograph the entire family in one place. He captured the iconic photo of William with Queen Mum. 1:23

Secrets of the Royal Babies tells the extraordinary tales of royal births, motherhood and infancy that have paved the way to this day and asks what Meghan and Harry might expect from this next stage of their lives.

Featuring interviews with historians, royal experts and insiders, the documentary explores unusual royal birthing traditions, how to cope with the domestic politics of life with a royal nanny and to how to juggle mothering with royal duties.

Secrets of the Royal Babies visits the Norland College nanny school in Bath, which is the go-to place for royal childcare, and Glamis Castle in Scotland, where young Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret could escape the glare of the media and formality of the Royal Court. The documentary also asks how Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex can learn from royal mothers before her - from Queen Victoria through to Princess Diana and the most recent royal mom, the Duchess of Cambridge.

 Watch the full documentary on CBC Gem now.

Or tune in Saturday May 11 or Sunday May 12 at 10 pm ET/PT on CBC News Network or Sunday May 19 at 9 pm ET/PT on the documentary Channel.

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