Tennis

Milos Raonic advances to 4th round at Wimbledon

Milos Raonic is heading to the round of 16 at Wimbledon. On Saturday, the Canadian won seven of nine games of a third-round match suspended the previous day because of darkness, beating Austrian qualifier Dennis Novak 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-5. 6-2.

Canadian completes win of match suspended due to darkness

Milos Raonic defeated Dennis Novak of Austria in the Round of 32 at Wimbeldon when their match resumed on Saturday. Play was suspended on Friday due to darkness. (Michael Steele/Getty Images)

​A good night's sleep helped Milos Raonic change his attitude and advance to the round of 16 at Wimbledon.

On Saturday, the Canadian won seven of nine games of a third-round match suspended the previous day because of darkness, beating Austrian qualifier Dennis Novak 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-5. 6-2. Raonic, the No. 13 seed from Thornhill, Ont., led 6-5 in the third set when play resumed.

Milos Raonic, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic all advanced to the fourth round, while top-ranked Simona Halep was eliminated Saturday at Wimbledon. 1:38

"I just came out with a very different mindset," said Raonic on Saturday. "I was extremely negative yesterday and just needed to come out with a very different state of mind and different approach today to have a better chance than I had yesterday.

The 27-year-old will face unseeded American Mackenzie McDonald in the fourth round on Monday. McDonald beat Lithuania's Ricardas Berankis, Chile's Nicolas Jarry and Argentina's Guido Pella to advance to the round of 16.

"I know him a little bit, practised with him a bunch. He's played well this year," said Raonic. "He's obviously had good wins through these last three matches here. It's going to be tough. You know, I'm going to have my chances. He likes to play more solid tennis, likes to take the ball early.

"I will have my chances, have to stay aggressive and try to dictate more to the rhythm of today rather than yesterday, that's for sure."

Raonic was the runner-up at the All England Club in 2016, losing to Andy Murray in the final. Raonic lost to eventual champion Roger Federer in last year's quarter-finals.

Djokovic dispatches Edmund

Novak Djokovic shrugged off a bad call by the chair umpire that cost him a break in his Wimbledon win over home favourite Kyle Edmund on Saturday.

He was less forgiving when it came to the way he was treated by the crowd at the All England Club.

"There is a certain unwritten borderline where you feel that it's a bit too much," Djokovic said about being booed at times by the partisan crowd on Centre Court. "I didn't deserve to be treated the way I was treated by certain individuals."

Neither the crowd nor a big mistake by the umpire could unglue Djokovic, though, as the three-time champion won 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4 to reach the round of 16 for the 11th time at the All England Club.

He was robbed of a break at 3-3, 15-40 in the fourth set when the ball bounced twice before Edmund managed to return it over the net. Djokovic complained to the chair umpire but the call stood — even though TV replays also showed Edmund's shot had actually landed wide.

Edmund ended up holding serve but Djokovic broke at his next opportunity to make sure there will be no British players in the second week of the tournament.

"I was 100 percent convinced it [bounced] twice," Djokovic said.

"Anybody can make a mistake. That's OK. But I don't understand why he (the umpire) didn't allow me to challenge the ball. I asked him. ... So, yes, it was quite a strange decision from (the) chair umpire, but it happens."

Nadal will remain world No. 1 

Rafael Nadal guaranteed he will stay No. 1 in the rankings after Wimbledon as he reached the fourth round with a 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 victory over 19-year-old Australian Alex de Minaur.

Nadal hasn't dropped a set so far in the tournament. Against de Minaur, he faced only three break points and saved them all, while producing nearly twice as many winners, 30-17.

This is Nadal's eighth trip to the round of 16 at the All England Club, where he has won two of his 17 Grand Slam titles. A year ago, the Spaniard lost at that stage.

He and Roger Federer have swapped the No. 1 ranking a half-dozen times this season, the most since there were eight changes in 1999.

Top-ranked Halep ousted 

Top-ranked Simona Halep was knocked out by Hsieh Su-Wei of Taiwan at Wimbledon, losing 3-6, 6-4, 7-5 in the third round.

Halep's exit means only one of the women's top-10 seeds remains in the tournament — No. 7 Karolina Pliskova.

Halep served for the match at 5-3 in the final set and had a match point in the next game, but the French Open champion couldn't capitalize on her chances. Hsieh saved the match point with a backhand winner before holding for 5-5 and broke Halep in the next game. The Romanian had two more break points at 6-5 but couldn't take advantage.

The match featured a total of 14 breaks of serve — seven for each player — including five straight to open the first set.

2016 finalist Kerber barely tested in win 

Former finalist Angelique Kerber advanced to the fourth round at Wimbledon without facing a break point after beating 18th-seeded Naomi Osaka 6-2, 6-4.

Kerber, a two-time Grand Slam champion, who was runner-up to Serena Williams at the All England Club in 2016, hit 23 winners and made just five unforced errors against her Japanese opponent.

As well as being one of only two former finalists — along with Williams — to make it through to the fourth round, 11th-seeded Kerber is the second highest seed remaining in the women's draw. Seventh-seeded Karolina Pliskova is the only top-10 player to have advanced to the second week.

With files from The Associated Press

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