Tennis federation defends umpire after Serena Williams controversy

The International Tennis Federation is defending the chair umpire who gave Serena Williams three code violations during the U.S. Open final, saying his "decisions were in accordance with the relevant rules."

Carlos Ramos' 'decisions were in accordance with the relevant rules,' says governing body

Chair umpire Carlos Ramos, left, either warned or docked Serena Williams three times during Saturday’s controversial U.S. Open final against Naomi Osaka. (Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

The International Tennis Federation is defending the chair umpire who gave Serena Williams three code violations during the U.S. Open final, saying his "decisions were in accordance with the relevant rules."

Williams was cited by Carlos Ramos three times Saturday during her 6-2, 6-4 loss to Naomi Osaka: for getting coaching signals; for breaking her racket, which cost her a point; and for calling Ramos a thief, which cost her a game.

Watch the controversial decision from the chair empire:

Williams was given a 3rd code violation in the 2nd set of the U.S. Open Final, resulting in the loss of a game. Naomi Osaka would go on to with the match in straight sets 6-2, 6-4. 3:47

On Sunday, the tournament referee docked Williams $10,000 US for "verbal abuse" of the chair umpire, $4,000 for being warned for coaching and $3,000 for breaking her racket.

The ITF said in a statement Monday that Ramos' citations were "reaffirmed by the U.S. Open's decision to fine Serena Williams for the three offences."

The governing body of tennis added that: "Ramos undertook his duties as an official according to the relevant rule book and acted at all times with professionalism and integrity."

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