Tennis

Milos Raonic injury hands Andy Murray No. 1 ranking for 1st time

Briton Andy Murray will take over from Novak Djokovic as world number one when the rankings are updated on Monday after his Paris Masters semifinal opponent Milos Raonic withdrew with a leg injury on Saturday.

Canadian says he's suffered a tear in his right quad, could miss ATP finals

Milos Raonic defeated France's Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in a quarter-final match on Friday, but then announced that he is withdrawing from the Paris Masters due to injury. (Christophe Ena/The Associated Press)

Andy Murray will hold the coveted No. 1 spot for the first time when the ATP rankings are published Monday after advancing to the Paris Masters final without playing a single point.

Murray benefited from Milos Raonic's withdrawal from the tournament — just one hour before the big-serving Canadian was scheduled to take on the 29-year-old Briton in the semifinals on Saturday.

Raonic said he withdrew because of a right leg injury.

"This morning I had trouble waking up and getting out of bed...Did some tests. Did an MRI half an hour ago, let's say.

"They found that I have a tear, Grade 1 tear in the right quad," Raonic said. "Unfortunately, I'm not able to compete against Andy today."

Raonic said he will need five to 10 days to recover, so his status is uncertain for the ATP finals which begin on Nov. 13 in London.

"I'm on the borderline for that," the fifth-ranked Raonic said. "I still have a possibility that I might be able to play."

Raonic defeated Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-2, 7-6 (4) in their quarter-final match on Friday.

Murray only needed to make the final in Paris to take top spot off Novak Djokovic. Murray will hold a five-point lead over Djokovic, who lost in the quarter-finals in Paris.

Murray faces American John Isner in the final.

Reaching the summit

Murray will become the first Briton to hold the top spot, no matter the result of Sunday's final. He will also be the oldest first-time No. 1 since John Newcombe at age 30 in 1974, and the 26th player to reach No. 1 since the rankings started in 1973.

Reaching the summit has been a long process for Murray, who has spent 76 weeks at No. 2, a position he reached for the first time in 2009.

A turning point in the Scot's career came when he hired Ivan Lendl as a coach in 2011. During their first stint together, Lendl managed to turn Murray from a four-time Grand Slam runner-up into a two-time major champion. Murray won Olympic gold in London in 2012 and the U.S. Open title later the same year. In 2013, he became the first British man to triumph at Wimbledon in 77 years.

Before winning the U.S. Open, Murray was 0-4 in Grand Slam finals. Only one other man in the Open era, which began in 1968, lost his first four major titles matches — Lendl. The Czech-born baseline player then went on to win eight Grand Slam singles titles during a 17-year career, spending 270 weeks at No. 1 in the world rankings.

'Much respect' from Djokovic

Djokovic held the top spot for 122 consecutive weeks. But after winning the French Open for the first time in June, his form has taken a dip. He lost in the third round at Wimbledon, and in the first round of the Olympics. At the U.S Open, he won the first set in the final but Stan Wawrinka rallied to beat him.

"He's definitely a player who deserves that," Djokovic said about Murray on Friday. "Undoubtedly, much respect for what he has done. We have known each other since very, very early days. We were, I think, 11 years old when we first played against each other. And to see how he has raised his level in the last 12 months is quite extraordinary."

One person was quick to congratulate Murray on Saturday — his mother Judy. "You've come a long way baby," Judy Murray tweeted , with an old photo of the two of them on a tennis court.

With files from Reuters

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