Denis Shapovalov knocked out of French Open

Denis Shapovalov's first career Grand Slam as a seeded player didn't last long. The No. 24 seed, from Richmond Hill, Ont., lost 5-7, 7-6 (4), 7-5, 6-4 to world No. 70 Maximilian Marterer of Germany in the second round of the French Open on Thursday.

Canadian eliminated by world No. 70 Maximilian Marterer of Germany

Canadian Denis Shapovalov’s stay at the French Open was brief as he lost his second-round match to German Maximilian Marterer on Thursday. (Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

Denis Shapovalov's first career Grand Slam as a seeded player didn't last long.

The No. 24 seed, from Richmond Hill, Ont., lost 5-7, 7-6 (4), 7-5, 6-4 to world No. 70 Maximilian Marterer of Germany in the second round of the French Open on Thursday.

Shapovalov, 19, was coming off trips to the semifinals and round of 16, respectively, at the past two ATP Masters 1000 events on clay courts. But he couldn't duplicate those runs in his main draw debut at Roland Garros.

"I'm only 19. Not every week is going to be the semifinals of a big tournament," Shapovalov said. "It's going to be ups and downs. I just have to keep enjoying it, keep enjoying the journey."

The No. 24 seed, from Richmond Hill, Ont., lost 5-7, 7-6 (4), 7-5, 6-4 to world No. 70 Maximilian Marterer of Germany in the second round of the French Open on Thursday. 1:15

In a battle of two players making their French Open main draw debuts, Shapovalov, 19, had more double-faults (11) than aces (six) and far more unforced errors (82) than winners (52). Shapovalov, 19, became the 10th men's seed to be eliminated at the tournament.

"I went up a set and a break [and was] feeling good and I let him back into the match a little bit," Shapovalov said. "After that, I was struggling a little bit with my serve. I could have served much better."

Shapovalov was the final Canadian player in the singles draw after Peter Polansky of Thornhill, Ont., and Vasek Pospisil of Vancouver lost first-round matches earlier this week.

"It's one of those days," Shapovalov said. "It's a little bit disappointing, but like I said credit to (Marterer). He played a really good match and he deserved to win today."

The loss prevented a possible showdown between Shapovalov and 10-time French Open champion Rafael Nadal, the top seed, in the fourth round.

Pospisil is scheduled to play a men's doubles match later Thursday.

Nadal cruising

Rafael Nadal has completed another straight-set win to reach the third round of the French Open.

Nadal is once again the big favorite in Paris following a tremendous clay-court season, and the 10-time champion lived up to the status by easily dispatching Guido Pella of Argentina 6-2, 6-1, 6-1 on Court Suzanne Lenglen.

Nadal hasn't lost a set at the French Open since 2015, when he was beaten in the quarterfinals by Novak Djokovic. In 2016, he withdrew with an injured left wrist after a pair of easy victories, then claimed every set he played last year en route to the trophy.

Against Pella, the top-ranked Spaniard saved all four break points he faced and hit 37 winners. He will be up against Richard Gasquet of France in the next round.

Williams bounces back

The "warrior princess" inside Serena Williams came out in full fighting mode on Thursday as the American proved she was no pushover in a Grand Slam with her 3-6 6-3 6-4 French Open second round win over Ashleigh Barty.

The rankings show Serena as only the 451st best player in the world and her nine-month-old daughter Alexis Olympia will need a few years to appreciate what her mum's day job is.

But anyone foolish enough to think that motherhood would kill off Williams' competitive edge got a rude reminder about why the 23-times Grand Slam champion is considered one of the sport's all-time great athletes.

A set and a break down, it looked like Williams' comeback slam following her maternity break would end in the second round against the 17th seeded Australian.

But when Serena slammed a crosscourt forehand winner into an open court to break back in the next game, the roar that rocked Philippe Chatrier Court told the world she was not done yet.

So it proved just over an hour later as Serena was roaring again and holding her arms aloft in triumph after setting up a third round showdown with Germany's 11th seed Julia Goerges.

With files from Reuters

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