World Cup·WOMEN'S WORLD CUP

Canadian players say score all you want, but tone down the celebrations

Canadian players were diplomatic Wednesday when asked about the Americans' 13-0 rout of Thailand and the unbridled celebrations accompanying the baker's dozen of goals at the Women's World Cup.

Members of national women's team diplomatic in discussing U.S. display against Thailand

Megan Rapinoe celebrates one of her American team's 13 goals against Thailand on Tuesday. The exuberant displays in such a lop-sided win drew criticism from many corners. (Alessandra Tarantino/Associated Press)

Canadian players were diplomatic Wednesday when asked about the Americans' 13-0 rout of Thailand and the unbridled celebrations accompanying the baker's dozen of goals at the Women's World Cup.

But veteran Desiree Scott suggested Canada might take the celebrations down a notch.

"It is a World Cup and you're going to take your opportunities and score those goals," said Scott, who has 144 caps for Canada. "I think we wouldn't back off either if were getting the goal-scoring opportunities.

"But I think we'd be maybe after the first few, maybe just tone (the celebrations) it down a little. That could be the humble Canadian in us that's also saying that. But I think just be mindful of the other team."

Tuesday's result in Reims marked the largest margin of victory in tournament history. And the top-ranked Americans did not hold back on the celebrations as they began defence of their world crown.

United States' Megan Rapinoe celebrates after scoring her team's ninth goal during a 13-0 rout of Thailand in the Women's World Cup on Tuesday, a display that offended some observers. (Francois Mori/Associated Press)

The goal celebrations irritated some observers. Other noted that goal difference is all-important at a World Cup, adding that scoring on the world showcase is indeed something to celebrate.

Midfielder Sophie Schmidt, who has 185 caps, said she didn't watch the U.S. game so was somewhat in the dark.

"If that was me, to just quietly run back to half(way after scoring) would be hard," she acknowledged.

Forward Janine Beckie, a dual U.S.-Canada citizen with 57 Canadian caps, said people are entitled to their opinion. But she had no issue with what happened.

"Personally I think if you're putting in as much work as you put in to get to a World Cup — and for a lot of those players that was their first World Cup goals — by all means celebrate," she said.

"We're at a World Cup and when it comes down to goal differential and winning games, they made their margin as big as they could. I mean you can't really fault that," she added.

"I also think it was class of them to console the Thailand players after the game. I thought that was great."

Beckie also noted some of the U.S. goals were "really, really high-quality goals that I think go in against a better team anyways."

Coach Kenneth Heiner-Moller said he didn't see the game so had no comment.

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