World Cup·WOMEN'S WORLD CUP

FIFA opens disciplinary case against Cameroon for offensive behaviour

FIFA has opened disciplinary proceedings against Cameroon for misconduct and offensive behaviour during the team's loss to England in the Women's World Cup.

Players rebelled against VAR decisions in loss to England, twice causing delay

Ajara Nchout of Cameroon, centre, reacts after her goal is disallowed via a VAR decision during her team's 3-0 loss in the Round of 16 against England at the women's World Cup. (Marc Atkins/Getty Images)

FIFA opened disciplinary proceedings Wednesday against Cameroon for players' conduct during the team's loss to England in the Women's World Cup.

The team protested VAR decisions in a 3-0 loss to England on Sunday, twice delaying kickoff as they complained. The players looked like they might refuse to continue playing.

The protests began when video reviews on offside decisions allowed Ellen White to send England to a 2-0 lead before halftime and then denied Cameroon the goal that would have brought them within one after the break. Ajara Nchout was sobbing on the sideline as she pleaded for her goal to stand.

FIFA told The Associated Press on Wednesday that its disciplinary committee opened a case against Cameroon over alleged breaches related to team misconduct, offensive behaviour and fair play.

The stance of the disciplinary division is in strong contrast to the view of Fatma Samoura, who runs the FIFA administration as the governing body's secretary general.

Samoura tweeted that the Cameroon players "inspired many young girls," with "passionate and talented play on the field that made your fans proud and your country is proud of you."

But Isha Johansen, president of CAF's women's committee, said the match "reflected badly not only on African women's football but African football on the whole." She wants punishment imposed.

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