Soccer

Equal pay appeal by U.S. women's soccer players set for March

Oral arguments in the appeal by players on the U.S. women's national soccer team who are seeking equal pay have been scheduled for March.

Team previously settled with federation on discriminatory work conditions claim

American soccer star Megan Rapinoe is seen above following an NWSL match in November. The U.S. national team players' appeal on their unequal pay lawsuit will be heard in court in March. (Elaine Thompson/The Associated Press)

Oral arguments in the appeal by players on the U.S. women's national soccer team who are seeking equal pay have been scheduled for March.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said Sunday the hearing will take place at 9:30 a.m. on March 7 in Pasadena, Calif. Under circuit court procedures, the identities of the three judges on the panel will be released publicly on Feb. 28.

"We hope 2022 will be the year of peace and health — and equal pay. We look forward to these oral arguments," players spokeswoman Molly Levinson said in a statement.

Players led by Alex Morgan sued the U.S. Soccer Federation in March 2019, contending they have not been paid equitably under their collective bargaining agreement compared with what the men's team receives under its agreement, which expired in December 2018. The women asked for more than $64 million US in damages plus $3 million in interest under the Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

U.S. District Judge R. Gary Klausner in Los Angeles granted a summary judgment to the federation on the pay claim in May 2020. The judge ruled the women rejected a pay-to-play structure similar to the one in the men's agreement with the USSF and accepted greater base salaries and benefits than the men. He allowed their allegation of discriminatory working conditions to go to trial, and the sides reached a settlement on that portion.

The USSF has said the women accepted a labour contract with greater guaranteed pay than the men and additional benefits. The USSF said on Sept. 14 it had offered identical contracts to the men's and women's unions, which are separate and have no obligation under federal labour law to agree to similar terms.

The women's union and the USSF agreed this month to extend their labour contract by three months through March.

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

A variety of newsletters you'll love, delivered straight to you.

Sign up now

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now