Leicester helicopter crash caused by mechanical fault

Leicester players led thousands of fans on a walk from the centre of the city to the club's stadium as soccer returned home for the first time since the death of the owner who oversaw the team's transformation into improbable English Premier League champions.

Footage of incident appears to show sections of tail rotor falling off in mid-air

Late Leicester City owner Vichai Srivaddhanaprabh and four others were killed in October after the tail rotor of their helicopter may have fallen off during mid-flight, according to investigators on Thursday. (Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

Investigators say the helicopter involved in a crash that killed the owner of English soccer team Leicester and four other people lost control because of a mechanical fault.

The Air Accidents Investigation Branch says the mechanism linking the pilot's pedals with the tail rotor blades became disconnected, resulting in the helicopter making an uncontrollable right turn before it spun and crashed.

Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha, the Thai retail entrepreneur who owned Leicester, was among those killed when his aircraft crashed and burst in flames outside the King Power Stadium following a Premier League game on Oct. 27.

The AAIB provided its update on Thursday after a detailed examination of the helicopter's control system. It will continue to investigate.

Footage of the incident appears to show that sections of the tail rotor may have fallen off in mid-air.

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