Soccer

MLS, players reach agreement on 5-year deal

Major League Soccer and its players' union have agreed in principle to a five-year labour contract, averting a possible strike ahead of Friday's season opener.

Strike averted before Friday's season opener

While the Los Angeles Galaxy celebrated winning the 2014 MLS Cup, the league and the players averted a possible strike with a reported five-year agreement Wednesday. (Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)

Major League Soccer and its players' union agreed in principle to a five-year labour contract, averting a possible strike ahead of Friday's season opener.

The deal, the culmination of talks that began last weekend in Washington, D.C., was announced Wednesday night and would replace the contract that expired Jan. 31.

Under the agreement, players 28 and older could become free agents if they have eight seasons of MLS service and their contracts have expired, a person familiar with the details said. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the details had not yet been announced.

The minimum salary would rise to $60,000 US, the person said. The minimum generally was $48,500 last year, but the prior deal contained a provision in which some players could be paid as low as $36,500.

"This agreement will provide a platform for our players, ownership and management to work together to help build Major League Soccer into one of the great soccer leagues in the world," MLS Commissioner Don Garber said in a statement.

MLS's 20th season begins this weekend, with the defending champion Los Angeles Galaxy hosting Chicago in the opener. The Fire travelled to California on Wednesday for the match.

"We are pleased to finally turn our fans attention back to our players and the competition on the field as we get started on the 2015 season," Bob Foose, executive director of the MLS Players Union, said in a statement.

Orlando and former FIFA Player of the Year Kaka host New York City and former Spanish World Cup champion David Villa on Sunday in the debut of the expansion teams that raise the league's total to 20 teams.

The league and the U.S. Soccer Federation are in the first year of eight-year broadcast agreements with ESPN, Fox and Univision Deportes that they hope will increase MLS's exposure and ratings.

MLS was established as a single entity in which the league owns all players' contracts. While stars such as Seattle's Clint Dempsey earn up to nearly $7 million, half the league's players last September had salaries under $100,000, according to the union.

The previous labour contract, in 2010, was reached five days before the season opener. This deal, like the 2010 agreement, was reached with the assistance of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. MLS has never had a work stoppage.

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