Soccer

Michel Platini 'between a witness, accused': Swiss AG

Michel Platini is being treated as "between a witness and an accused person" and the Swiss authorities would raid the UEFA president's office if necessary to discover the "real truth," the attorney general said Tuesday.

Swiss attorney general doesn't rule out office raid to find 'real truth'

Michel Platini, UEFA president, is being treated between a witness and an accused person by the Swiss attorney general investigating payments he received from FIFA boss Sepp Blatter. (Shaun Botterill/Getty images)

Michel Platini is being treated as "between a witness and an accused person" and the Swiss authorities would raid the UEFA president's office if necessary to discover the "real truth," the attorney general said Tuesday.

Platini was questioned Friday about a 2011 payment from FIFA which led to a criminal case being opened against Blatter, who was quizzed as a suspect.

Swiss Attorney General Michael Lauber wouldn't be drawn about what might follow for Platini, or the specifics of the case against Blatter for "tactical reasons."

But asked if he would be prepared to raid Platini's UEFA office, Lauber responded: "I will do anything, if I can do something, to clear up what's the real truth and if I have enough elements to go there I could not exclude that I also have to go there."

Blatter was questioned why about why FIFA paid 2 million Swiss francs [about $2 million] to Platini in 2011 for work supposedly carried out at least nine years earlier. Platini, who denies wrongdoing, is yet to explain publicly why there was such a long gap before the payment was made.

Asked if the authorities were satisfied with Platini's answers, Lauber said: "We did not [question] Mr. Platini as a witness ... we investigated against him as in between a witness and an accused person.

"If I was satisfied or not, I can't tell you because I would do real big damage to the investigation."

German federation president Wolfgang Niersbach said Tuesday that he expects a "transparent explanation" about the payment and Scottish Football Association chief executive Stewart Regan called it an "essential piece of information" to be cleared up.

Speaking at Zurich University, Lauber described the ongoing FIFA case as a "big investigation."

"This is not a 90-minute game," he said. "It's like more or less not even at the half [time] break."

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