Soccer

CONCACAF unveils 2 major women's tournaments set to debut before Paris 2024

Two major women's tournaments for teams in North and Central America and the Caribbean will debut over the next three years, the region's governing body of soccer announced Thursday.

Inaugural CONCACAF W Championship ready for 2022, Gold Cup in 2024

Jessie Fleming scores Canada's first goal from the penalty spot during the women's gold medal match at the Tokyo Olympics. The new CONCACAF women's championship tournament will include Canada and serve as a qualifier for the 2023 Women's World Cup. (Naomi Baker/Getty Images)

Two major women's tournaments for teams in North and Central America and the Caribbean will debut over the next three years, the region's governing body of soccer announced Thursday.

The inaugural CONCACAF W Championship will take place in 2022 and the CONCACAF W Gold Cup will debut in 2024.

The W Championship will serve as the regional qualifier for the FIFA Women's World Cup Australia and New Zealand 2023 and the 2024 Paris Olympics.

The tournament will include reigning Olympic champion Canada and the United States, along with the winners of six qualifying groups.

The winning nation will earn a place in the 2024 Olympics and the 2024 CONCACAF W Gold Cup.

The runner-up and the third-place team will progress to a CONCACAF Olympic play-in series to be played in September of 2023. The winner of that series will also guarantee their place in the Olympics and the Gold Cup.

"These new competitions will be game-changing for women's football in CONCACAF," Karina LeBlanc, CONCACAF Head of Women's Football and former Canadian national team goalkeeper, said in a release.

"We are providing a platform for women footballers in CONCACAF to thrive, and for women and girls throughout the region to support their national teams with pride."

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