Soccer·CHAMPIONS LEAGUE

Liverpool builds 2-0 quarter-final lead over Porto

Liverpool built a 2-0 lead over Porto heading into the second leg of their quarter-final thanks to first-half goals by Naby Keita and Roberto Firmino at Anfield on Tuesday.

Keita, Firmino score 1st-half goals to lead team to victory

Liverpool's Naby Keita celebrates with Roberto Firmino, left, after scoring the opening goal during the Champions League quarter-final against Porto on Tuesday. (Dave Thompson/The Associated Press)

Different round, same comfortable win. Porto must be sick of the sight of Liverpool in the Champions League.

Liverpool built a 2-0 lead over Porto heading into the second leg of their quarter-final thanks to first-half goals by Naby Keita and Roberto Firmino at Anfield on Tuesday.

A year after beating Porto 5-0 on aggregate in the last 16, Liverpool found similar joy against a Portuguese team which is widely regarded as the biggest outsider left in the competition.

Keita's strike from just inside the area deflected into the top corner off Porto midfielder Oliver Torres to give Liverpool the lead in the fifth minute.

The English side had more chances to score — Mohamed Salah wasted a one-on-one after pouncing on an errant back-pass — before Trent Alexander-Arnold was played through by Jordan Henderson and crossed for Firmino to tap into an empty net from close range in the 26th.

Porto occasionally threatened to score a crucial away goal, with striker Moussa Marega twice denied by goalkeeper Alisson Becker, but Liverpool looks in good shape to reach the semifinals for a second straight year. Last season, Juergen Klopp's team got to the final, only to lose to Real Madrid.

Salah might count himself fortunate to still be available for the second leg in Porto on April 17 after escaping punishment for a studs-up tackle on the shin of Danilo in the final minutes.

Whichever team advances will next face either Manchester United or Barcelona, who start their quarter-final matchup on Wednesday with the first leg at Old Trafford.

With a newfound defensive strength this season, Liverpool is in with a good chance of winning the Premier League, too. It is in first place, two points ahead of Manchester City.

Tottenham wins despite losing Kane to injury

Son Heung-min filled the void left by Harry Kane's injury-enforced departure by giving Tottenham a 1-0 win over Manchester City on Tuesday in the first leg of their Champions League quarter-final.

Twenty minutes after Kane hobbled off with an apparent left ankle injury, Son netted in the 78th minute to give quadruple-chasing City its first loss in any competition since January.

After receiving a pass on the right from Christian Eriksen, Son's poor first touch nearly put the ball over the byline, but he just kept it in play. The South Korean then cut the ball back and skipped past Fabian Delph's challenge before striking a low shot under goalkeeper Ederson.

Son also scored in Tottenham's first game at its new stadium last week and he now has 18 goals in a season that has seen him miss spells to go on South Korea duty at the Asian Games in August and the Asian Cup in January.

If Kane faces a lengthy spell on the sidelines, Son has already shown he can deputize for the 24-goal striker.

Kane missed seven games across six weeks with damaged ligaments in his left ankle across January and February — a spell when Son scored four goals.

Goalkeeper Hugo Lloris prevented Tottenham from conceding its first goal at the new stadium when he saved a penalty in the 13th minute from Sergio Aguero after a sliding Danny Rose was adjudged to have blocked Raheem Sterling's shot with his hand.

In an intense game, the Premier League gulf between the sides was not apparent. City is challenging for the title in second place, 16 points ahead of a Tottenham side clinging on to fourth place and the final Champions League spot for next season.

This was Tottenham's first quarter-final in European football's elite competition in eight years — the last time a Champions League game was staged on this site in north London before the team was forced to play at Wembley while a new home was built.

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