Soccer

Brazil soccer plane crash: What is Chapecoense?

A plane carrying the Brazilian soccer team Chapecoense crashed in Colombia on Tuesday, killing 71 people aboard. Here are some facts about the club, which is not widely known to North American sports fans.

Team founded in 1973, plays in city located 1,000 kilometres southwest of Rio

The CBC's Signa Butler explans what the Brazilian soccer team Chapecoense is, and its connection to the community 2:48

A plane carrying the Brazilian soccer team Chapecoense crashed in Colombia on Tuesday, killing 71 people aboard.

Earlier in the day, officials reported a higher death toll. Colombian aviation authorities later lowered the figure to 71 from 75, saying four fewer people were aboard the aircraft than originally stated, The Associated Press reported. 

Here are some facts about the club, which is not widely known to North American sports fans:

  • Full name: Associação Chapecoense de Futebol.
  • Based in: Chapeco, a city of about 210,000 located about 1,000 kilometres southwest of Rio de Janeiro.
  • Founded: 1973.
  • Stadium: Arena Conda (capacity 22,600).
  • League: Two stints in Brazil's top league, Serie A (1979, 2014-present).
  • Titles: Won Santa Catarina state titles in 1977, 1996, 2007, 2011.
  • 2016 regular-season record: 13-13-11 (ninth in 20-team Serie A).
  • Top scorer: Bruno Rangel (10 goals in 32 matches).

Copa Sudamericana

After defeating a pair of teams from Argentina and another from Colombia, Chapecoense was about to play the biggest match in its history — on the road in the first leg of the two-game Copa Sudamericana final on Wednesday against Atletico Nacional of Medellin.

The Copa Sudamerica is equivalent to the UEFA Europa League tournament, which is not as prestigious as Europe's top pro tournament (the UEFA Champions League), but still features top clubs.

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