Sports

Romain Grosjean to sit out F1 season finale after fiery crash

Formula One driver Romain Grosjean will not race at next Sunday's Abu Dhabi Grand Prix and instead will fly home to Switzerland, where he will continue his recovery for the burns on his hands following a horrific crash at last weekend's Bahrain Grand Prix.

French driver to get burns treatment as risk of racing 'too big' for his health

French driver Romain Grosjean, left, will return home to Switzerland for burns treatment of his hands instead of racing in the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, the F1 season finale, on Dec. 13. (Peter Fox/Getty Images)

Formula One driver Romain Grosjean will not race at next Sunday's Abu Dhabi Grand Prix and instead will fly home to Switzerland, where he will continue his recovery for the burns on his hands following a horrific crash at last weekend's Bahrain Grand Prix.

Grosjean had initially hoped he would recover enough mobility in his hands to compete in the season's finale, but he will again be replaced by Pietro Fittipaldi on Dec. 13, the Haas team said on Sunday. Fittipaldi was making his F1 debut later Sunday at the Sakhir GP in Bahrain.

WATCH | Massive crash at Bahrain Grand Prix splits F1 car in half:

Massive crash at Bahrain F1 race splits car in half

1 year ago
Duration 2:59
France's Romain Grosjean crashed heavily into barrier splitting the car in half at the Bahrain F1 race. Grosjean walked away from the crash with minor injuries. 2:59

"It is with great sadness that I will not be able to do my final race in Abu Dhabi and be with the team there," Grosjean said. "We've tried as much as we could with the doctor to recover and to repair my hand, but the risk of racing is too big for my recovery and my health. It's one of the hardest decisions of my life, but it's obviously one of the wisest."

Grosjean made his F1 debut in 2009 and secured 10 podiums, twice finishing second. Last Sunday he somehow escaped after being trapped inside the Haas car for nearly 30 seconds after it exploded following a first-lap crash.

The 34-year-old Grosjean's F1 career may effectively be over since he was being replaced next season at Haas, with Michael Schumacher's son Mick coming in to begin his F1 career. The 21-year-old German won the F2 title on Sunday.

Team principal Guenther Steiner praised Grosjean, who joined F1 newcomer Haas in 2016.

"Romain has shown exceptional bravery and amazing spirit over the last few days. We know how badly he wanted to be able to return to the cockpit in Abu Dhabi," Steiner said. "There is no doubting the determination and sheer effort he has put into helping us to achieve what we have as a young team in Formula 1. We will forever be grateful for that belief and commitment."

WATCH | Grosjean escapes car after crash at Bahrain GP:

Romain Grosjean escapes car after fiery crash at F1 Bahrain

1 year ago
Duration 1:03
French driver Romain Grosjean escapes his fire-filled car after a heavy crash that tore his car in half at Sunday's F1 race in Bahrain. 1:03

The veteran had a strong season with Lotus in 2013, when he drove alongside 2007 F1 champion Kimi Raikkonen and secured six podiums, including three straight and a second place at the U.S. Grand Prix.

Grosjean's future is unclear since he will not be able to get an F1 seat next year. He previously expressed an interest in IndyCar racing, but the crash risk element is high in oval-track racing.

Grosjean, who has three young children, said in a television interview earlier this week that he was not as enthusiastic as he had been about the IndyCar series after reflecting on it following his horror crash.

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

A variety of newsletters you'll love, delivered straight to you.

Sign up now

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now