Player's Own Voice

Player's Own Voice podcast: The softer side of Georges Laraque

Georges Laraque joins the Player's Own Voice podcast to discuss, in order: his case of COVID-19, anti-racism work, LGBTQ support, volunteering, politics, veganism, speed skating, Jackie Robinson and living right.

Former NHL enforcer talks about COVID-19, his anti-racism efforts and more

Former NHL tough guy Georges Laraque joins the latest edition of CBC Sports' Player's Own Voice podcast. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press)

Georges Laraque has to be the world's most interesting NHL enforcer: he combined heavy fists with a light touch around the net for 14 years in the show.

He's also an inspirational figure in the effort to rid hockey of racism. He's a potent ally of LGBTQ communities. He's vegan. He was deputy leader of the federal Green party. His autobiography was a bestseller in both of Canada's official languages.

Recently, Laraque caught COVID-19 while volunteering with seniors in Montreal, doing what he personally could to protect them from the pandemic (he got tested immediately, quarantined, and passed the virus to nobody else).

Safe to say, Laraque could be the nicest guy ever to make a living terrorizing opponents on the ice. Former speed skater Anastasia Bucsis, host of the Player's Own Voice podcast, has her own not-so-secret reasons to admire 'The Rock': he came to hockey by way of speed skating. In fact, this is the first CBC Sports podcast episode to conclude with a race for charity speed skating challenge.

Listen as Bucsis gets the NHL veteran talking about recent highlights from a career lived in the headlines.

Like the CBC Sports' Player's Own Voice essay series, the POV podcast lets athletes speak to Canadians about issues from a personal perspective. To listen to all three seasons, subscribe for free on iTunes, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Tune In or wherever you get your other podcasts.

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