Player's Own Voice

Player's Own Voice podcast: Watching the World Cup with Diana Matheson

The Player's Own Voice podcast takes a close look at Team Canada at the FIFA Women's World Cup, with analysis from Canadian soccer veteran Diana Matheson. The injured star may be sidelined for this tourney, but she has high hopes for her team in France.

Canadian women's soccer star joins CBC Sports' Anastasia Bucsis

The ultra intense competitor and three-time Olympic medallist appears on Player's Own Voice podcast this week. (The Canadian Press)

Player's Own Voice podcast takes a timely visit with Canadian soccer star Diana Matheson, and measures the national squad's chances as FIFA Women's World Cup is underway.

Anastasia Bucsis, podcast host and two-time Olympic speed skater, talks with a history-creating guest. Midfielder Diana Matheson's stoppage-time goal against France at the London Olympics in 2012 gave Canada a bronze medal. She backed that up with a second Olympic bronze at Rio. Matheson has more than 200 caps with the Canadian national team. Four World Cups. Three Olympics. Team Canada since 2003. She plays professionally for the Utah Royals — and along the way she also picked up an economics degree from Princeton.

There's a good news/bad news story in Matheson's 2019 FIFA campaign. The bad news is that a foot injury has sidelined her for the duration of the tournament. The positive spin on that is she's freed up to provide expert colour commentary on the tournament, and help give viewers insights on Team Canada's mindset, throughout the World Cup.

Like the CBC Sports' Player's Own Voice essay series, POV podcast lets athletes speak to Canadians about issues from a personal perspective. To listen to Diana Matheson, or the first two guests this season, Brian Burke and Tessa Virtue, or to listen to all the athletes from Player's Own Voice season one, subscribe for free on iTunes, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Tune In or wherever you get your other podcasts.

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