Liam Gill to replace injured Derek Livingston as lone Canadian in men's snowboard halfpipe

Canada's Derek Livingston will not compete in men's snowboard halfpipe at the Beijing Olympics after sustaining a lower-body injury during a recent training run.

18-year-old becomes only Indigenous athlete on Canadian snowboard team

Liam Gill, shown here during the Land Rover U.S. Grand Prix World Cup in March, replaced Derek Livingston on the Canadian snowboard team due to injury. (Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

Canada's Derek Livingston will not compete in men's snowboard halfpipe at the Beijing Olympics after sustaining a lower-body injury during a recent training run.

Livingston, from Aurora, Ont., will be replaced by Calgary's Liam Gill in the event.

The 18-year-old Gill, who learned he was moving from alternate to Olympian only days before the team charter left for Beijing, will be the second-youngest member of the Canadian snowboarding contingent.

Livingston said he is "devastated" that he won't be participating in the Games but is excited that Gill gets an opportunity.

Gill, a member of the Łı́ı́dlı̨ı̨ Kų́ę́ First Nation in Fort Simpson, N.W.T., is the only Indigenous athlete on the Canadian snowboard team.

Snowboard halfpipe competition runs Feb. 9-11 at Genting Snow Park.

With files from CBC Sports

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