Road To The Olympic Games

Curling

Europe beats Canada to secure back-to-back curling Continental Cup titles

Team Europe kept pressure on Canada with a win and a pair of ties on Sunday at the Continental Cup curling tournament in London, Ont.

Oskar Eriksson's winning blow helps Europeans make historical title defence

Team Europe secured its second straight Continental Cup title after defeating Canada 37.5-22.5 at the annual tournament on Sunday. (@CurlingCanada)

Europe has secured its second straight Continental Cup title.

Needing just four of an available 18 points to win its first-ever back-to-back titles, Europe took what it needed in Sunday's night draw to beat Canada 37.5-22.5 at the annual tournament.

On the last shot of the fourth end, Sweden's Oskar Eriksson, skipping the evening's mixed team, delivered the winning blow.

"I was actually a little bit nervous there for the first time in a long time," said Eriksson. "I knew I was going to be close and trusted all the practice from hitting a runback from the centre line, I know I'm always close.

"We absolutely outplayed them all week and we deserved this."

Europe takes home the winning prize of $135,000, with each player, the two coaches and captain earning $5,000 each.

The Canadian crew had to score 15 points in the final draw to win its seventh title in the past eight years.

Canada splits its runner-up money of $67,500 shared with 24 team members, who receive $2,500 each.

Canada coach Jeff Stoughton gave full credit to Europe's performance.

"They made all the right shots and hats off to them, they've had a wonderful four days," said Stoughton.

The Continental Cup format pits Canada against Europe in a series of team play, mixed doubles, scrambles and skins games.

Teams earn points by winning games and the first to score 30.5 points is declared the champion.

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