Road To The Olympic Games

Canadians sweep Egypt to improve to 2-0 at volleyball worlds

Canada is off to a perfect start at the world volleyball championship. The Canadians (2-0) won in straight sets for the second time in as many days on Thursday, beating Egypt 3-0 (27-25, 30-28, 25-19) in Ruse, Bulgaria.

Nicholas Hoag led Canada with 24 points

Canada has swept both the Netherlands and Egypt in the first two matches of the world volleyball championships. (Volleyball Canada)

Canada is off to a perfect start at the world volleyball championship.

The Canadians (2-0) won in straight sets for the second time in as many days on Thursday, beating Egypt 3-0 (27-25, 30-28, 25-19) in Ruse, Bulgaria.

"It was a difficult game, even though we won 3-0, especially in the second set it was pretty tight," said Canada coach Stephane Antiga, whose team opened the tourney with a win over the Netherlands.

"We probably were a little bit anxious because of the fact that we were the favourites, and that's something that the team doesn't seem comfortable with for some reason," he added. "But we played more aggressively at the end of each set and in the third set, which is good. I would like to see us with a little more confidence."

Watch Canada sweep past Egypt:

Nicholas Hoag led the way with 24 points as Canada beat Egypt in straight sets, and improved to 2-0 at the volleyball men's world championship in Ruse, Bulgaria. 1:58

Nicholas Hoag of Sherbrooke, Que., led Canada with 24 points. Captain Gordon Perrin added 18 points and Graham Vigrass had seven.

"We could have played better of course and we definitely want to play better, but it's good that we showed signs of resilience and we really fought hard to keep the momentum on our side and made sure we controlled the game, even though it was a little out of hand at times," said Canada's Sharone Vernon-Evans.

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