Road To The Olympic Games

Track and Field

Caster Semenya appeal case ends, decision expected in late March

The Court of Arbitration for Sport says a week-long hearing for South African athlete Caster Semenya's appeal against hormone regulations proposed by the international track and field body ended Friday. A decision in the "pivotal" case is expected in late March.

Hearing concludes with 2-time Olympic champion having the 'last word'

Caster Semenya's appeal of hormone regulations at the Court of Arbitration for Sport concluded Friday in Lausanne, Switzerland, with a decision expected to arrive in late March. (Petr David Josek/The Associated Press)

The Court of Arbitration for Sport says a week-long hearing for South African athlete Caster Semenya's appeal against hormone regulations proposed by the international track and field body ended Friday. A decision in the "pivotal" case is expected in late March.

The Swiss-based court says the hearing ended with Semenya, the two-time Olympic 800-metre champion, having the "last word."

IAAF president Sebastian Coe also spoke at the hearing, which has repercussions for the future of sport and how athletes with differences in sexual development are treated.

The IAAF wants Semenya and other female athletes with what it calls abnormally high natural levels of testosterone to lower those levels through medication to be eligible to compete in top events like the world championships and the Olympics in distances from 400 metres to the mile.

WATCH | Caster Semenya: Physical gift or unfair advantage?

In a watershed moment for gender politics in sport, hyperandrogenic runner Caster Semenya is going to court against the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) to fight their female eligibility rules. CBC Sports' Jacqueline Doorey explains. 2:15

The regulations were due to be implemented in November last year but were suspended pending Semenya's appeal to sport's highest court.

CAS says the hearing "was conducted in a cordial and respectful atmosphere" despite the emotive issue and the decade-long battle between Semenya and the IAAF.

Semenya's lawyers said at the outset of the hearing that the proposed regulations would discriminate against the runner for what was a "genetic gift."

CAS says the decision will be announced "on or before March 26."

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