Road To The Olympic Games

Olympics

IOC president says he understands Tokyo's COVID-19 emergency move

Thomas Bach, head of the International Olympic Committee, said on Wednesday he fully understood the decision to declare a state of emergency in Tokyo to fight the coronavirus pandemic, and was committed to holding a safe, successful Games.

Plans for combatting COVID-19 at Summer Games to be unveiled throughout week

International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach said via video link on Wednesday that his organization is fully committed 'to the successful and safe delivery of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.' (Nicolas Datiche-Pool/Getty Images)

Thomas Bach, head of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), said on Wednesday he fully understood the decision to declare a state of emergency in Tokyo to fight the coronavirus pandemic, and was committed to holding a safe, successful Games.

Bach was speaking at the start of a meeting with Tokyo 2020 organizers to finalize the second edition of the "playbooks" of rules for the Summer Games, with less than three months to go and Japan battling a surge of coronavirus cases.

Parts of Japan including the capital were put under another state of emergency at the weekend, and most of the Japanese public think the Games, postponed from 2020 because of the pandemic, should be canceled or postponed again.

The emergency, which is due to last until May 11, requires restaurants and bars serving alcohol to close along with large stores, cinemas and other commercial facilities, asks firms to let staff work from home, and excludes spectators from big sports events.

WATCH | Explaining the 1st Playbook:

The IOC released their Olympic Playbook: What does that mean?

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With less than six months to go to the Tokyo Olympics, organizers have said the Games will go on no matter what. Now, they've released some preliminary guidelines explaining how that will happen. 1:37

Speaking by video link, Bach told organizers, including Tokyo 2020 President Seiko Hashimoto, that he understood the move, and that compliance with the playbooks, which lay out a number of anti-infection measures, would be strictly enforced.

"The IOC is fully committed to the successful and safe delivery of the Olympic and Paralympic Games," he said.

An earlier edition of the rules, which came out in February, banned singing and chanting during events and mandated that event participants wear masks at all times except when sleeping, eating or outdoors.

Spectators from overseas have already been excluded, but more than 10,000 athletes, coaches and their entourages are expected in July.

WATCH | 1st Playbook unveiled:

Olympic officials unveil 1st COVID-19 ‘playbook’

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4 months ago
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Olympic officials have unveiled the first in a series of ‘playbooks’ for how they'll keep the upcoming Tokyo Games safe during the pandemic. The guide dictates how people can travel, where they can go and even how they can cheer. 1:57

Athletes and coaches will undergo virus testing on a daily basis, according to media reports. Kyodo news agency said officials who come into close contact with athletes will also need to be tested every day.

A decision on the number of domestic spectators allowed into venues may not come until June.

Though Japan has not suffered as badly from COVID-19 as many other countries, the infection rate has risen back to levels not seen since January, and more and more are from variant strains. On Wednesday, Tokyo reported 925 new cases.

The Games run from July 23 to Aug. 8.

WATCH | Answers to key questions surrounding the Tokyo Olympics:

Answers to key questions surrounding Tokyo Olympics

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2 months ago
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There’s less than 100 days to go until the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games, which are full steam ahead despite the pandemic. Here are the answers to the biggest questions surrounding the competition. 3:41

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