Summer Sports

World Anti-Doping Agency to probe weightlifting federation doping allegations

The World Anti-Doping Agency has begun an investigation into doping violations after an inquiry led by Canadian lawyer Richard McLaren uncovered 40 positive adverse analytical findings hidden in the International Weightlifting Federation records.

Recent inquiry exposed 40 positive adverse analytical findings hidden in IWF records

In a scathing report released earlier this month, Canadian lawyer and law professor Richard McLaren and his team found the International Weightlifting Federation had been plagued by decades of corruption and also discovered doping infractions. The World Anti-Doping Agency is now investigating. (Hassan Ammar/Associated Press/File)

The World Anti-Doping Agency has begun an investigation into doping violations after an inquiry led by Canadian lawyer and law professor Richard McLaren uncovered 40 positive adverse analytical findings hidden in the International Weightlifting Federation records.

In a scathing report released earlier this month, McLaren and his team found that the IWF had been plagued by decades of corruption and also discovered the doping infractions.

These include gold and silver medallists who have not had their samples dealt with.

"WADA is appalled by the behaviour exposed by the McLaren Investigation Team," WADA president Witold Banka said in a statement. "The agency condemns all interference with anti-doping procedures with the utmost vigor.

"These revelations are incredibly upsetting for clean athletes, for WADA and for all advocates of clean sport."

McLaren's investigation determined that the IWF's former president Tamas Ajan used "the tyranny of cash" to maintain control and the primary sources of this money came from doping fines paid personally to him.

The 81-year-old Hungarian had been at the IWF since the mid-1970s, serving first as secretary general and then as president from 2000 until his resignation in April.

WADA said the information it received covers the period from 2009-2014 and its own investigation would give priority to those cases that are close to the statute of limitations.

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