Road To The Olympic Games

Track and Field

Canada's Camryn Rogers shatters NCAA record to earn hammer throw gold

Canada's Camryn Rogers shattered the U.S. collegiate record in winning her second NCAA hammer throw title on Thursday.

22-year-old likely headed to Olympics after hurling 4th-longest toss of year

Canada's Camryn Rogers, seen above in 2018, threw an NCAA women's record 75.52 metres to win the national hammer throw title on Thursday. (Charlie Crowhurst/Getty Images for IAAF)

Canada's Camryn Rogers shattered the U.S. collegiate record in winning her second NCAA hammer throw title on Thursday.

The 22-year-old from Richmond, B.C., threw 75.52 metres โ€” the fourth longest throw in the world this year โ€” to win gold.

The junior at the University of California broke the previous NCAA record of 73.32 with her first throw of 74.97. She then crushed it again with a 75.52-metre bomb on the final throw of the competition.

Rogers is a virtual lock to be named to Canada's Olympic team for Tokyo, since she's already achieved the Tokyo Olympic standard and boasts Canada's best throw this season.

She won't compete at the Canadian trials later this month in Montreal. Athletics Canada has said because of the 14-day quarantine rules for people coming home to Canada, athletes don't need to compete at trials to be named to the team.

Rogers won the 2019 NCAA title. Last year's NCAA outdoor season was cancelled due to COVID-19.

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