Road To The Olympic Games

Track and Field

3-time Olympic gold medalist Bobby Joe Morrow dies at 84

Three-time United States Olympic gold-medalist sprinter Bobby Joe Morrow has died. He was 84.

Won gold in the 100 and 200 metres and 400 metre relay at 1956 Melbourne Games

American Bobby Morrow wins the 100m event at the Olympic Games in Melbourne, on November 24, 1956. (AFP via Getty Images)

Three-time United States Olympic gold-medalist sprinter Bobby Joe Morrow has died. He was 84.

Morrow died Saturday in San Benito, Texas. He died of natural causes, according to published reports.

Morrow won the gold medal in both the 100 and 200 metres at the 1956 Games in Melbourne, Australia. He also anchored the goal-medal winning 400 metre relay team.

Morrow's 20.6-second time in the 200 matched the world record at the time.

He was named "Sportsman of the Year" by Sports Illustrated at the end of the year. Morrow was inducted into the National Track and Field Hall of Fame in 1989.

At the time of his Olympic performance, Morrow was a student at Abilene Christian University.

In this Oct. 13, 2006, file photo, Bobby Joe Morrow, left, is honored with an Olympic portrait of himself during the inauguration of the Bobby Morrow Stadium in San Benito, Texas, at halftime of a football game. Morrow, the Texas sprinter who won three gold medals in the 1956 Melbourne Olympics while a student at Abilene Christian University, died Saturday, May 30, 2020. He was 84. (Lynn Hermosa/Valley Morning Star via AP, File)

The football stadium at San Benito High is named Bobby Morrow Stadium. He played football in addition to being a track star while attending San Benito High.

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