Equestrian

Australian equestrian banned from Tokyo Olympics after positive test for cocaine

Equestrian Australia said Wednesday it had provisionally suspended a member of the Olympic show jumping team over a positive test for cocaine.

Jamie Kermond was expected to make Olympic debut in Tokyo

Australia's Jamie Kermond, seen here on July 3, 2015, returned a positive A-sample for a metabolite of cocaine following a test conducted by Sport Integrity Australia on June 26. (Loic Venance/Getty Images)

The Australian Olympic Committee said show jumper Jamie Kermond has been removed from the equestrian team for the Tokyo Games after testing positive for cocaine.

Equestrian Australia had earlier said Kermond returned a positive A-sample for a metabolite of cocaine following a test conducted by Sport Integrity Australia on June 26.

It said Kermond was banned from competing at the Tokyo Olympics but had the right to have his B-sample analyzed. The 36-year-old Kermond was expected to make his Olympic debut at Tokyo.

The Australian Olympic Team's chef de mission Ian Chesterman announced later Wednesday that Kermond's place in the Australian team had been terminated.

WATCH | Bring It In panel previews Tokyo Olympics:

Olympic Preview Show | Bring It In

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Host Morgan Campbell is joined by panellists Meghan McPeak and Dave Zirin, for the official Bring It In Olympic preview in the final days ahead of Tokyo 2020. 35:37

The same fate befell Canadian Nicole Walker, even though she was cleared of a positive test for cocaine.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled in May that Walker inadvertently ingested a cocaine metabolite drinking South American tea, but did not reinstate the Canadian team for this summer's Tokyo Olympics.

Walker of Aurora, Ont., was stripped of her results in the 2019 Pan American Games in Lima, Peru, after testing positive for benzoylecgonine on the day of the team final.

Canada tumbled from fourth to seventh in the team event, and out of the last qualifying berth for Tokyo.

with files from The Canadian Press

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