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Armand Duplantis clears 6.17m to break men's world pole vault record

Swedish pole vaulter Armand Duplantis broke the men's world record on Saturday, jumping six metres 17 centimetres at an indoor meet in Torun, Poland, beating by one centimetre the record set by France's Renaud Lavillenie in 2014.

U.S.-born Swedish athlete takes down mark held by Renaud Lavillenie since 2014

Armand Duplantis of Sweden set a world record of six metres 17 centimetres in men's pole vault on Saturday at an indoor meet in Torun, Poland, beating by one centimetre the mark set by France's Renaud Lavillenie in 2014. (Matthias Hangst/Getty Images)

Swedish pole vaulter Armand Duplantis broke the men's world record on Saturday.

Duplantis jumped six metres 17 centimetres at an indoor meet in Torun, Poland, beating by one centimetre the record set by France's Renaud Lavillenie in 2014. It's a strong statement ahead of the pole vault competition at the Olympics in Tokyo in August.

"It's something that I wanted since I was three years old," Duplantis told World Athletics. "It's a big year, but it's a good way to start it."

Nicknamed "Mondo," Duplantis broke the world record in his second attempt on Saturday after earlier winning the meet with ease. He attempted the record without success at another meet in Germany four days ago.

The 20-year-old Duplantis, who was born and raised in the United States, was a child prodigy who broke age-group records on his way to joining the pole vaulting elite. He chose to compete internationally for Sweden, his mother's home country. He won the silver medal at last year's world championships.

The record needs to be officially ratified by World Athletics, which doesn't approve records until it receives confirmation of a clean doping test from the event.

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