Generic Olympic

Evan Dunfee causes Canadians to go wild for race walk

While Canadian race walker Evan Dunfee walked the walk, Canadian fans talked the talk by supporting the Olympian in his gruelling 50-km race. In a sport that does not get much attention, people seemed to be captivated by Dunfee's performance and ensuing controversy.

Strange twists spark plenty of reaction from Canadians

Canada's Evan Dunfee is given water by officials after finishing the men's 50km race walk. (Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)

By Aaron Stern, CBC Sports

While Canadian race walker Evan Dunfee walked the walk on Friday in Rio, Canadian fans talked the talk by supporting the Olympian in his grueling 50-kilometre race walk event.

In a sport that does not get much attention, people seemed to be captivated by Dunfee's performance along with the controversial decision to award then take away the bronze medal.

The race walker did just about everything (except for run) and was in first place for a solid portion of the race, sparking lots of reaction:

He eventually fell to fourth place and couldn't seem to regain his stride after taking an elbow in a rare race-walking physical clash. ​ 

At the end of the race, Dunfee collapsed in exhaustion:

People were amazed and proud of the great strength and endurance the Canadian showed throughout the race:

Dunfee would eventually protest the race because of the elbow bump he received.  His protest was initially successful and he was awarded a bronze medal but after an appeal by the Japanese race walker, he was stripped of the medal. This medal rewarding then stripping madness created even more chaos and reaction:

What did you think about Dunfee's performance? Are you now a bigger fan of race walking? What do you think about the decision to reward and then take away his medal? Tweet us @CBCOlympics!

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now