Olympics

Polish Olympian Maria Andrejczyk auctions medal for infant's life-saving operation

Poland's Maria Andrejczyk auctioned her silver medal from the Tokyo Games to raise money for a life-saving operation for an infant boy, and then was told by the buyer that she could keep her prize.

25-year-old javelin thrower overcame bone cancer, shoulder injury to compete in Tokyo

Poland's Maria Andrejczyk stands on the podium during the medal ceremony for the women's javelin throw at the Tokyo Olympics. Andrejczyk auctioned her silver medal for an infant with a heart defect in need of life-saving surgery. (Matthias Hangst/Getty Images)

An Olympic athlete from Poland auctioned her silver medal from the Tokyo Games to raise money for a life-saving operation for an infant boy, and then was told by the buyer that she could keep her prize.

Maria Andrejczyk, a 25-year-old javelin thrower who overcame bone cancer and a shoulder injury to compete at this year's Olympics, said she decided to auction her medal to help the boy knowing how much she had to "fight against adversity and pain."

The money is for Milosz Malysa, an infant with a heart defect whose family has been raising funds for him to be operated on in the United States. Milosz's parents posted last week that the boy was at risk of dying soon without the surgery.

Zabka, a popular convenience store chain in Poland, bid $51,000 US but said it would let the athlete keep her medal.

"We were moved by the beautiful and extremely noble gesture of our Olympian," Zabka said.

Fans have contributed an additional $76,500 to help the boy.

Even before the winning bid was made, the authorities in Andrejczyk's community in Poland said they were prepared to make her a replica of the medal.

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