Road To The Olympic Games

Hayley Wickenheiser to donate brain to concussion research

Retired Canadian hockey star Hayley Wickenheiser will donate her brain after she dies for research on concussions and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, according to the Concussion Legacy Foundation.

4-time Canadian Olympic gold medallist retired from women's hockey last year

Retired women's hockey great Hayley Wickenheiser is joining the more than 2,800 former athletes and military veterans who have promised to donate their brains to the Concussion Legacy Foundation. (Antonio Calanni/Associated Press)

Retired Canadian hockey star Hayley Wickenheiser will donate her brain after she dies for research on concussions and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, according to the Concussion Legacy Foundation.

The Boston-based organization announced in a news release Tuesday that the four-time Olympic gold medallist, made the pledge along with four-time U.S. Olympian Angela Ruggiero and American bobsledder Elana Meyers Taylor.

More than 2,800 former athletes and military veterans have promised to donate their brains to the foundation.

Wickenheiser experienced dizziness and nausea after getting hit while playing in a Swedish men's pro league a decade ago.

She was also friends with former NHL defenceman Steve Montador who was diagnosed with CTE after his death in 2015.

Wickenheiser has also cited her witnessing of his deteriorating condition as a reason for getting involved with digital therapeutics company Highmark Interactive, which is developing video games to help diagnose and treat concussions and brain injuries.

The Canadian hockey legend retired last year as the country's all-time leading scorer. 

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