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Perdita Felicien pulling out of Olympics: reports

Perdita Felicien has abandoned her attempt to come back from injury and compete at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, according to multiple media reports.

Perdita Felicien has abandoned her attempt to come back from injury and compete at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, according to multiple media reports.

The Canadian hurdler's agent, Renaldo Nehemiah, confirmed to CBC Sports that Felicien will hold a conference call on Tuesday.

At that time, the Pickering, Ont., native is expected to announce she's taking herself out of contention for the Aug. 8-24 Beijing Games.

"I'm sure she's thought this over many times," Canadian head coach Les Gramantik told the Toronto Star late Monday. 

"I know [Felicien's coach] Gary [Winckler] feels she's not in a position to be able to race. It's not a big secret … her chances to be reinjured are pretty high and it's in an area that could end her career."

Felicien, 27, suffered a stress fracture in her left foot during a training session in February, and hasn't raced since.

The former world champion in the 100-metre hurdles received a medical exemption allowing her to skip the Canadian track and field championships in early July, and was named to the Canadian team for Beijing conditional on her being able to run the Olympic "B" standard of 13.11 seconds by July 22.

Felicien, who captured silver at last year's world championships in Japan, told CBC Sports in an interview during the Canadian championships that she wouldn't risk jeopardizing her career in order to qualify for the Olympics.

"The question is, if I am not 100 per cent, if I'm at 80 per cent health, do I risk not being where I need to be health-wise in a few months to rush to be ready for the Olympic Games, and that's something I'm not willing to do," she said.

Felicien, though, indicated that she'd give it her all in an effort to make it to Beijing.

"It's not in me just to stop and not try," she said. "I'm going to go until the final hour, until the doctors are like, 'You know what, no, let's sit back, it's too risky.'"

With files from the Canadian Press