Sports

We're not 'Kawhi-ing,' you're 'Kawhi-ing'

When a moment happens that unites a country there will be replays, opinion pieces, and analysis. There will also be memes.

A great Canadian sporting moment calls for great Canadian sports memes

Toronto Raptors forward Kawhi Leonard celebrates with teammates after making the buzzer-beating shot to defeat the Philadelphia 76ers in a classic Game 7 on Sunday. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)

Four bounces and then an explosion of epic proportion.

The fadeaway jumper made by Kawhi Leonard in Sunday's Game 7 against the Philadelphia 76ers secured the Toronto Raptors a spot in the Eastern Conference final for just the second time in franchise history.

But you already knew that didn't you? 

Of course you did, because you probably watched it live? 

No? 

Well, then a replay highlight? 

Nope?

Ohhhhh, then you probably saw a meme of the epic Canadian Heritage moment?

Ding, ding, ding! That's right! 

But maybe someone should tell Leonard what a Canadian Heritage moment actually is? 

Psst, Kawhi, it's this:

WATCH | Leonard's bouncing buzzer-beater sends Raptors to East final:

Kawhi Leonard poured in 41 points, including a dramatic game-winner as the Toronto Raptors beat the Philadelphia 76ers 92-90 to advance to the Eastern Conference Finals. 1:23

The moment was great, but have you seen it with Korean commentary? 

Or how about a slow-mo version? 

Yeah? But have you tried playing Kanye West's song Father Stretch My Hands Pt. 1 to it?

Everything's better with music, after all. 

Ok, but what about side by side with the 2001 Vince Carter fadeaway jumper that had a much different outcome?

And what could be more fun than watching the opposing team's devastation, side by side with the winners' jubilation? 

How about next to the little karateka named Phoenix from Orlando whose viral video shows us all what perseverance looks like: 

Brings a tear to the eye, doesn't it?

So what does Leonard make of all this meme-ing? 

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