NHL

Jared Spurgeon scores twice as Wild blank Canucks in Game 1

Jared Spurgeon scored twice for the Minnesota Wild in a 3-0 win over the Vancouver Canucks to start their qualifying series Sunday.

Minnesota goalie Alex Stalock earns 1st career playoff win with 28-save shutout

Minnesota Wild's Zach Parise (11), Jared Spurgeon (46), Kevin Fiala (22) and Eric Staal (12) celebrate a goal during the second period of Minnesota's win over the Vancouver Canucks on Sunday in Edmonton. (Codie McLachlan/The Canadian Press)

Alex Stalock and an unyielding Minnesota Wild defence frustrated the Vancouver Canucks' top shooters en route to a 3-0 win to open their NHL qualifying series Sunday.

Stalock's first career playoff victory was a 28-save shutout, which he credited to teammates not giving up the middle lane to the Canucks or giving Vancouver many clean entries into their zone.

"Our guys did an unbelievable job staying with them," Stalock said.

Jared Spurgeon scored twice, including an empty-netter, and assisted on Kevin Fiala's goal. The Edmontonian became the first Wild defenceman to record a three-point game in the playoffs.

WATCH | Wild shut down Canucks to open series:

Wild lock down the Canucks offence to win game 1

1 year ago
0:51
Alex Stalock had 28 saves to backstop the Minnesota Wild to a 3-0 shutout of the Vancouver Canucks. 0:51

Minnesota scored a pair of power-play goals, going 2-for-4 with a man advantage. Eric Staal assisted on both of them.

Outshot 31-28, Vancouver mustered just four shots on Stalock in the third period and none on their lone man advantage of the game with 3:40 to play.

"We've got to get to the inside and make it hard for their goalie," Canucks defenceman Alex Edler said. "Usually in the playoffs, it comes down to special teams and tonight we lost that battle."

Game 2 of the best-of-five series is Tuesday.

In the first playoff start of his nine-year career, Vancouver's Jacob Markstrom stopped 28 shots in the loss.

WATCH | Wild's Matt Dumba raises fist during Canadian, American anthems:

Matt Dumba raises fist during national anthems

1 year ago
0:26
Minnesota Wild defenceman Matt Dumba continued his fight against racial injustice as he raised his first during both the American and Canadian national anthems. 0:26

Matt Dumba raised his fist on the Wild's bench during both the Canadian and American national anthems Sunday.

The Regina defenceman, who is half-Filipino, explained earlier in the day he intends to do that for the rest of the NHL's restart from the COVID-19 pandemic in homage to former Wild forward J.T. Brown.

Brown did the same during the "Star Spangled Banner" in 2017 as a member of the Tampa Bay Lightning to protest police brutality and racism.

With the NHL's blessing, Dumba made a speech at Rogers Place centre ice stressing the need for social and racial justice prior to Saturday's game between the Edmonton Oilers and Chicago Blackhawks.

The Wild haven't won a playoff series since 2015, which was also the last year the Canucks saw the post-season.

Vancouver (36-27-6) was the seventh seed in the Western Conference, while Minnesota (35-27-7) was 10th.

"For the first game, how we played, you'd love to say it was a great road game because we were the road team," Wild head coach Dean Evason said. "It wasn't like we didn't play offence or didn't try to play offence. When we had an opportunity to defend we did that hard."

Halfway through the second period, Staal fed Spurgeon a cross-ice pass from the boards. Spurgeon whipped a low shot under both the left leg of a diving Edler and Markstrom's left pad.

Three seconds into an Edler tripping penalty, Fiala scored from the high slot at 2:50 of the first period.

Markstrom got a piece of Fiala's snapshot, but not enough as the puck trickled behind him.

"I thought we had some good looks, obviously their goaltender played well. Just got to put the puck in the net," Vancouver captain Bo Horvat said.

"It's a five-game series for a reason. It's far from over."

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

A variety of newsletters you'll love, delivered straight to you.

Sign up now

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now