NHL·Poll

Ted Nolan fired by Sabres

The Buffalo Sabres announced on Sunday that Ted Nolan has been relieved of his duties as head coach.

Buffalo posted league-worst record this season

Buffalo Sabres interim head coach Ted Nolan, top center, looks on as his team falls behind the Colorado Avalanche in the third period of the Avalanche's 7-1 victory on Feb. 1, 2014. (David Zalubowski/The Associated Press)

Buffalo Sabres general manager Tim Murray announced on Sunday that head coach Ted Nolan has been relieved of his duties.

Assistant coach Danny Flynn was also let go, while the contracts of Bryan Trottier and Tom Coolen will not be renewed. 

Nolan guided the Sabres to a league-worst record of 23-51-8 in 2014-15 to finish last for the second year in a row. 

He was hired by Buffalo in November of 2013 and compiled a mark of 40-87-17 in just under two seasons. 

"I don't think it was a bad fit. I don't think it was a great fit," said Murray. "Maybe it's just chemistry. Maybe it's just two different personalities."

Murray made some additional comments when he addressed the media shortly after reaching his decision.




This was Nolan's second stint in Buffalo after he spent two seasons with the Sabres and was the NHL's coach of the year in 1997.

In March of 2014, 4-1/2 months after returning to Buffalo, Nolan was signed to a three-year contract extension. 

At the time, Murray was impressed by the job that Nolan was doing in what the GM called a "trying situation."

Nolan also coached the New York Islanders before being fired after his second season in 2008. In his first year, New York went 40-30-12 to make the playoffs.

Nolan was in good spirits but declined comment when reached by The Associated Press.

"I'm just going to reflect on it and come out with a statement in the next couple of days," Nolan said.

With files from The Associated Press

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