Hockey Night in Canada

Phil Kessel brings Stanley Cup to Toronto SickKids Hospital

Phil Kessel made more than just a few children smile as he brought the Stanley Cup to the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children.

Former captain Phaneuf joins Kessel for Cup celebration

Pittsburgh Penguins forward Phil Kessel celebrates after winning the Stanley Cup in June. On Monday, Kessel returned to Toronto with Lord Stanley's mug and made a stop at the Hospital for Sick Children. (Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

One year ago, the thought of Phil Kessel with the Stanley Cup in Toronto was pretty much unimaginable. 

How times can change. 

On Monday, the oft-criticized former Maple Leafs' star made good on his promise to bring the Cup to the city he called home for five years. 

However, instead of a flashy news conference or a public event, Kessel made a quiet visit to a place he knew would appreciate it – Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children. 

The 28-year-old spent the day Monday at SickKids sharing the Cup with children and their families. 

When Kessel first announced in late June that he would be returning north of the border with the Cup, many thought the former Leaf was just taunting the Toronto fan base that hasn't celebrated its own championship since 1967.

However, the Madison, Wis., native now seems to have quashed any bad feelings about the move with the Toronto faithful. 

Kessel even had some extra company coming down for the big visit – former Maple Leafs captain Dion Phaneuf and actress wife Elisha Cuthbert. 

Kessel amassed 394 points in 446 career regular-season games during his five-year tenure with Toronto before being traded to Pittsburgh last summer. After an unspectacular regular season, Kessel had 22 points in 24 playoff games as the Penguins won their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history.

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