NHL

Having lost his passion for hockey, Patrik Berglund feels at peace a month after quitting Sabres

​Patrik Berglund tells Sweden's Hockeypuls.se he feels at peace and has no regrets after abruptly ending his hockey career by walking away from the Buffalo Sabres a little over two months into the season.

Swede tells website he was frustrated after trade from St. Louis

Swedish forward Patrik Berglund walked away from the Buffalo Sabres in December. (Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

Patrik Berglund tells Sweden's Hockeypuls.se he feels at peace and has no regrets after abruptly ending his hockey career by walking away from the Buffalo Sabres a little over two months into the season.

"I just knew I had to go home to find myself again," Berglund told the publication in speaking for the first time since the Sabres terminated the final three-and-a-half years left on his contract last month. The Sabres acted after suspending Berglund on Dec. 15 when he failed to report for the game at Washington.

Berglund was interviewed at his home in Vasteras, Sweden. The story was published in Swedish on Friday and translated by Google.

Difficulty handling trade from Blues

Berglund says he lost some of his passion for hockey last summer after being traded to Buffalo by St. Louis. Berglund was the Blues first-round draft pick in 2006 and spent 10 seasons in St. Louis.

He says he had difficulty handling the move, and eventually became tired of trying to hide his frustrations.

Berglund says his emotions had nothing to do with playing in Buffalo, and he apologized to the Sabres for betraying them.

Berglund provides no indication regarding his future plans. He added he's not concerned about walking away from the remainder of his five-year, $19.25 million contract.

"My contract, and all the money I gave up means nothing," Berglund said. "I can give up that amount at any time to feel good inside."

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