NHL

NHLers weigh in on idea of an all-Canadian pandemic division

Mitch Marner was asked recently about the possibility of the NHL going with an all-Canadian division next season.

With U.S. border still closed, a 7-team circuit north of the 49th parallel seems likely

With the coronavirus showing no signs of slowing and the border with the United States still closed to non-essential travel, a seven-team Canadian circuit, with all the glorious rivalries it would provide, seems likely. (Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press)

Mitch Marner was asked recently about the possibility of the NHL going with an all-Canadian division next season.

The league finished its pandemic-delayed 2019-20 campaign with tightly-controlled bubbles in Toronto and Edmonton to protect against the spread of COVID-19, but with the coronavirus showing no signs of slowing down and the border with the United States still closed to non-essential travel, a seven-team circuit north of the 49th parallel seemed likely.

"It would definitely be interesting," Marner, a star winger with the Toronto Maple Leafs, said last month. "We've got to be ready for whatever happens."

Well, commissioner Gary Bettman indicated this week the league is exploring the idea of temporary realignment in 2020-21.

And an all-Canadian division appears to indeed be on the table.

"We're not going to move all seven Canadian franchises south of the 49th parallel ... so we have to look at alternative ways to play," Bettman said Tuesday as part of a virtual panel discussion during the 2020 Paley International Council Summit. "While crossing the U.S.-Canadian border is an issue, we're also seeing within the United States limitations in terms of quarantining when you go from certain states to other states.

"It's again part of having to be flexible."

Bettman added the league, which is working closely with the NHL Players' Association, is contemplating the possibility of a reduction from the usual 82-game schedule and the use of temporary hubs where teams would play a fixed number of games in the same location and then return home for a period of time before resuming action.

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It remains to be seen if Canadian clubs would set up in a hub or travel to individual cities, but if the Maple Leafs, Montreal Canadiens, Ottawa Senators, Winnipeg Jets, Calgary Flames, Edmonton Oilers and Vancouver Canucks wind up grouped together, fans could be in for a treat.

"The Canadian teams are quite strong," Montreal head coach Claude Julien said in October. "It might be a very competitive division. We know that Ottawa is being rebuilt — that doesn't mean they aren't competitive — but the other teams all believe in their chance to make the playoffs.

"People are likely to see very exciting and very competitive hockey."

Six of Canada's seven franchises took part in the summer resumption of play, with only the Senators on the outside looking in. There's optimism in each city for whenever the league gets going — the NHL continues to target a Jan. 1 start date — and the temperature between rivals could be turned up with more games against the same opponents.

"It would be pretty cool, especially for Canadian hockey fans," Canucks captain Bo Horvat said. "It'll be heated and it'll be some good hockey if it happens."

Rivalries galore

It also doesn't hurt that some of the game's biggest names — including Edmonton's Connor McDavid and Leon Draisaitl, Marner and Auston Matthews with Toronto, Vancouver's Elias Pettersson and Winnipeg's Patrik Laine — could be pitted against each other more often.

"It would be a cool experience," Marner said. "We've just got to be ready for whatever happens."

Toronto, Montreal and Ottawa usually play in the Atlantic Division, Winnipeg is in the Central, and Vancouver, Edmonton and Calgary are in the Pacific.

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Senators forward Connor Brown, who was acquired from the Leafs in the summer of 2019, said he wouldn't mind facing his old club a little more often.

"It would be interesting," he said. "It's all speculation, but it would be different."

Canadiens winger Brendan Gallagher added that, like the bubble concept used during the restart, players have to be prepared to adapt on the fly.

"If that is the case, an all-Canadian division, I think it would be pretty unique," he said. "Pretty neat you to get to see those other teams a little bit more and have an appreciation for what they do. And at the same time, there's a little bit of pride involved when you're playing for your Canadian division.

"I'm sure everyone would have a little bit of motivation."

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