NHL

Flyers defenceman Keith Yandle's 'iron man' streak to end at 989 games

The Philadelphia Flyers scratched defenceman Keith Yandle for Saturday's game against Toronto, ending the NHL's iron man record for consecutive games played at 989.

35-year-old passed Doug Jarvis' record on Jan. 25 with 965th consecutive game

Flyers' Keith Yandle started his streak on March 26, 2009 in his time with the Coyotes. (Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images)

The Philadelphia Flyers scratched defenceman Keith Yandle for Saturday's game against Toronto, ending the NHL's iron man record for consecutive games played at 989.

The 35-year-old Yandle started his streak March 26, 2009, with Phoenix. He passed retired centre Doug Jarvis for the mark of 965 games on Jan. 25 against the Islanders. Yandle was a healthy scratch.

The Flyers are one of the worst teams in the NHL and looking at a youth movement down the stretch with a 21-35-11 (53 points) heading into Saturday's game.

"We're at the point in the season where as an organization it's important we get some young players in," Flyers coach Mike Yeo said. "We have to have an eye on the future and what's coming down the road. We have to give some new guys an opportunity."

Arizona Coyotes forward Phil Kessel now has longest active streak at 968 consecutive games played.

Yandle has only one goal and 15 assists in 67 games.

"It's kind of been one of those things toward the end of the year when you're signing young guys and getting free agents out of college, they're going to give them a chance to play," Yandle said after Saturday morning's skate. "It's tough to have a bad day in the NHL. But getting the news you're not playing is not what you want to hear."

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