Hockey Night in Canada

Sorry, Seattle: NHL GMs learned from Vegas expansion draft

After the Vegas Golden Knights took advantage of a few teams during their expansion draft last year, NHL general managers should be more prepared when it's Seattle's turn to draft their roster.

'No matter what you do you're going to lose a good player,' says Flyers GM Chuck Fletcher

Vegas Golden Knights general manager George McPhee was able to garner a creative advantage during last year's expansion draft, and may have made NHL general managers smarter because of it. (John Locher/The Associated Press)

Hindsight is 43/35 for the Columbus Blue Jackets.

That's how many goals and assists William Karlsson put up for the Vegas Golden Knights after the Blue Jackets let him go in the most recent NHL expansion draft. They also sent first- and second-round draft picks to Vegas to unload David Clarkson's contract and hold on to forward Josh Anderson and goaltender Joonas Korpisalo.

"I think we've looked at probably 100 times already that, 'Could we have done something different the last time around?"' Columbus general manager Jarmo Kekalainen said. "Probably not. You're going to make some mistakes and you might let the wrong guy go. You do your studying, you do your evaluation of your players and you do your projections and it's not an exact science."

Maybe the second time's the charm.

NHL teams face another expansion draft in 2021, when Seattle enters the league. And the Seattle GM, whoever that turns out to be, probably won't receive the same kind of windfall George McPhee picked up in 2017 to help the Golden Knights make a run all the way to the Stanley Cup Final because some important lessons have been learned.

Fool me twice ... 

"We might get to a situation where we're like, 'Boy I don't want to lose any of these guys,' so a team may have to do it again," Dallas Stars GM Jim Nill said. "But we've lived it now and I think we'll have a better understanding of it. And if you're going to [make a trade], you're going to make sure it's for the right person. You're going to be like: 'I'm giving up a lot of assets here. Is this the right thing to do?"'

McPhee held all the leverage that summer, and he stockpiled talent as a result. Because only seven forwards, three defencemen and a goaltender (or seven skaters at any position and a goaltender) could be protected, a lot of deep teams were stuck with core players unprotected and willing to do almost anything to keep them.

Just some of the "fear factor" moves: The Wild traded prospect Alex Tuch and let centre Erik Haula go to Vegas to keep Matt Dumba. The Panthers traded Reilly Smith and lost Jonathan Marchessault. The Islanders traded a first-round pick to get rid of Mikhail Grabovski's contract. The Ducks traded Shea Theodore to clear Clayton Stoner's salary and keep Sami Vatanen and Josh Manson. The Penguins even sent a future second-round pick to ensure Vegas would take goalie Marc-Andre Fleury.

Chuck Fletcher, who was Minnesota's GM, figured out the hard way that expansion means every team loses something. Now with Philadelphia, his approach will likely be to lose as little as possible to Seattle.

"No matter what you do you're going to lose a good player," Fletcher said. "You either let them make the choice for you or you try to help them out by making sure you're keeping the things you want to keep. It was a great process to go through and I'm sure there were some lessons learned, but at the end of the day, if you have too many players than you can protect, you've got to pick your poison."

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