Hockey Night in Canada

NHL

How Canadian NHL teams fared last night

The Ottawa Senators had the Canadian NHL spotlight to themselves Wednesday night as they were the lone north of the border team in action, playing in Washington. Here's how they fared and a look at the only other matchup, Pittsburgh at Boston.

Holtby comes up big vs. Senators; Bruins blank Penguins

Washington defeats Ottawa 2-1. 0:29

The Ottawa Senators had the Canadian NHL spotlight to themselves Wednesday night as they were the lone north of the border team in action, playing in Washington. Here's how they fared and a look at the only other matchup, Pittsburgh at Boston.

Senators shut down by hot Holtby

Washington's Braden Holtby made 26 saves and improved his NHL-leading goals-against average to 1.83 to lead the Capitals (22-6-2) to a 2-1 home ice win over the Ottawa Senators (16-11-5).

It was Holtby's third straight victory while allowing just one goal in each game as the Capitals notched their 22nd victory of the season, second only to Dallas with 23 wins.

Andrew "The Hamburglar" Hammond made his first start in over a month and stopped 23 shots. Michael Latta beat him in the first period, while John Carlson, with an assist from Latta, made it 2-0 in the second period.

Ottawa's Bobby Ryan's power-play goal with 4:14 remaining in the game spoiled Holtby's shutout bid.

The Capitals Tom Wilson was given a match penalty in the third period for a hit on Curtis Lazar.

Bruins, Rask blank Penguins

The Bruins scored a goal in each period and Tuukka Rask turned aside all 34 Penguins shots as Boston blanked visiting Pittsburgh 3-0 at the TD Garden. It was Rask's 30th career shutout.

Maxime Talbot, Jimmy Hayes and Ryan Spooner, on a power play into an empty net, provided the Bruins scoring against Jeff Zatkoff who made 26 saves.

Boston (17-9-4) moved two points ahead of idle New Jersey in seventh spot in the Eastern Conference. The Penguins (15-12-3) are five points behind Boston for 11th in the conference.

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