NHL

Ovechkin, Pavelski named captains of World Cup teams

Alex Ovechkin was named Russia's captain for the World Cup of Hockey on Wednesday, while Joe Pavelski received the nod for the United States.

Tournament begins Sept. 17

WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 16: Alex Ovechkin #8 of the Washington Capitals looks on against the Ottawa Senators at Verizon Center on December 16, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images) (Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

Alex Ovechkin has been named Russia's captain for the World Cup of Hockey.

The Russian Ice Hockey Federation announced the decision Wednesday. It also says Evgeni Malkin and Pavel Datsyuk will serve as the alternate captains.

The 30-year-old Ovechkin has been captain of the Washington Capitals for the past six seasons. He has 525 goals and 441 assists for 966 points in 839 NHL games and was captain when Russia won the world hockey championship in 2014.

Malkin, 30, has been an alternate captain for the Pittsburgh Penguins since 2008, winning the Stanley Cup twice in that time.

Datsyuk, 38, recently left the NHL's Detroit Red Wings to return home to Russia and play for St. Petersburg of the Kontinental Hockey League.

The World Cup begins Sept. 17 in Toronto.

Americans tap Pavelski

The United States named San Jose Sharks forward Joe Pavelski their captain, with Chicago Blackhawks forward Patrick Kane and Minnesota Wild defenceman Ryan Suter to serve as alternates.

Forwards David Backes, Ryan Kesler and Zach Parise, and defenceman Ryan McDonagh were also named to what the team called its "leadership group."

Pavelski, the Sharks' captain, represented the U.S. at the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, and was also a member of the team that took the silver medal in 2010 in Vancouver. He had 78 points (38 goals) for San Jose last season.

With files from CBC Sports

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