Hockey

Junior team's collapse broken down

For the second year in a row, Canada suffered a crushing defeat in the gold-medal match of the world junior hockey championship, this time in unbelievable fashion. Russia's five-goal third period left Canada — and its fans — in disbelief. Where did it go wrong? CBCSports.ca breaks down the final game-changing moments.
Team Canada players react after losing to Russia 5-3 in the IIHF world junior championship gold-medal final in Buffalo, N.Y., on Wednesday. ((Nathan Denette/Canadian Press))

For the second year in a row, Canada suffered a crushing defeat in the gold-medal match of the world junior hockey championship, this time in unbelievable fashion. Russia's five-goal third period left Canada — and its fans — in disbelief. Where did it go wrong? CBCSports.ca breaks down the final game-changing moments.

2nd period:

  • Canada takes a commanding 3-0 lead at the 6:27 mark of the second period with a goal by Brayden Schenn, who was later voted the tournament's most outstanding player.
  • The Russians change goalies, replacing Dmitri Shikin with Igor Bobkov. (Bobkov was pulled in the first game of the tournament when Canada beat Russia 6-3.)  
  • Just over a minute later, Russia's Artyom Voronin takes a penalty for high sticking. The Canadians get some good scoring opportunities but Bobkov pulls off the saves. You can almost sense an increase in confidence from the Russians.
  • At 10:33, Erik Gudbranson of Canada gets a penalty for boarding.  The Russians have a strong power play and force Canadian goalie Mark Visentin to make several solid saves. It's the first time Russia shows it has a lot of life remaining.
  • The Russians get another penalty, this time at 13:51 to Denis Golubev for slashing. The Canadian power play begins to look a bit disoriented, the Russians have a strong penalty kill and get a few solid scoring opportunities while a man short.
  • Just before the period ends, Canada gets a penalty for too many men on the ice. It's the type of penalty that illustrates confusion and a lack of concentration.  

2nd period ends: Canada 3 - Russia 0

Tim Wharnsby of CBCSports.ca reports on what occurred in the two dressing rooms between periods.

"Still, in the Canadian dressing room in the second intermission, there was no hint that the tables were about to be turned. "We weren't too high. We weren't too down," Schenn said. "I thought we were where we needed to be."

Down the hall in the Russian dressing room, head coach Valeri Bragin let his players have it. He broke the white board and urged them for one more comeback like they did against Finland in the quarter-finals and Sweden the following afternoon in the semis.

"After that, we have no choice but to win," said Russian forward Maxim Kitsyn, who scored his club's second goal, 13 seconds after Artemi Panarin scored his first of two."

3rd period:

  • Canada starts the period short-handed and kills off the penalty, but is being outhustled.  Moments later, at 2:33 of the third, Artemi Panarin of Russia scores.
  • Right after the faceoff, the Russians take the puck into the Canadian zone. There's a scramble in front of the net and the puck dribbles through the legs of Canadian goalie Mark Visentin. The goal scored by Maxim Kitsyn totally changed the game.
  • The Canadian crowd tries to rally the team, with little luck. Russia presses a heavy forecheck and takes control of the game at both ends of the ice.
  • At 7:29, Russia's Vladimir Tarasenko scores to tie the game 3-3. Tarasenko was taken off the ice late in the second period as a result of a big collision and an apparent rib injury. His tying goal stuns the Canadian team and the crowd.
  • Immediately after the goal, Dave Cameron, Canada's coach, calls a timeout and is seen loudly and aggressively urging his players to go back to basics, which means a strong forecheck, dominating the boards in the offensive zone and strong backchecking. It seems to work as Canada gets stronger.
  • Then at 15:22, Russia's Vladimir Tarasenko takes the puck behind the Canadian net and feeds his teammate, Artemi Panarin, who is all alone in front for the go-ahead goal. The air is sucked out of the HSBC Centre in Buffalo.
  • The Canadian team tries to come back, but the Russians defend well in their own end. The Canadians are unable to dominate the boards as they did in the first period when they controlled the game.
  • At 18:44, Russian Nikita Dvurechensky beats the Canadian defenceman, cuts in front of the net and and beats Mark Visentin for the last goal of the game.

Final score: Russia 5 - Canada 3