Hockey

Former Hockey Canada executive Nicholson to testify before parliamentary committee

Former Hockey Canada president and CEO Bob Nicholson is scheduled to speak before the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage on Tuesday.

Organization been mired in controversy for months over mishandling of sexual assault allegation

Bob Nicholson, the CEO of Hockey Canada from 1998-2014, is set to appear in front of a parliamentary committee regarding the ongoing examination of the organization. (Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

Former Hockey Canada president and CEO Bob Nicholson is scheduled to speak before the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage on Tuesday.

Nicholson has been an executive with the Edmonton Oilers since 2014 and has been the NHL team's chairman since 2019.

He's been called before the parliamentary committee as part of its ongoing examination of Hockey Canada.

The national sport organization has been mired in controversy for months over its mishandling of a sexual assault allegation that includes players on the 2018 men's world junior team.

An investigation into that sexual assault has been opened by London, Ont., police and Halifax police are investigating gang rape allegations involving members of the 2003 men's junior team as well. None of the allegations have been proven in court.

Nicholson was in charge of Hockey Canada from 1998 to 2014.

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