Golf

Tiger Woods says running early in career 'destroyed my body and my knees'

Tiger Woods, who is tied with Sam Snead for the most wins in PGA Tour history, cautioned young golfers about the pitfalls of taking up running during a recent question-and-answer session with fans.

Former world No. 1 had multiple knee, back surgeries after winning 13 major titles

Tiger Woods says running over 30 miles a week for probably my first five, six years on tour pretty much destroyed my body and my knees." (Katelyn Mulcahy/Getty Images)

Tiger Woods cautioned young golfers about the pitfalls of taking up running during a recent question-and-answer session with fans.

Woods, 44, was asked the following question Friday on GolfTV: "If you had one thing you could go back in time and tell your younger self, what would it be?"

Woods was quick with a response.

"Yeah, not to run so much," he said. "Running over 30 miles a week for probably my first five, six years on tour pretty much destroyed my body and my knees."

Per Golf.com's Nick Piastowski, Woods previously would start his day with a four-mile run before hitting both the weight room and the golf course. He'd finish off his day with another four-mile run.

WATCH | Woods wins the Masters for his 15th career major title:

Tigers Woods wins the Masters by 1 stroke for his 15th major tournament victory. 1:41

Woods is tied with Sam Snead for the most wins (82) in PGA Tour history. He won 13 of his 15 career major championships prior to the age of 33 before injuries began to take their toll, requiring multiple knee and back surgeries.

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