Golf

Lawsuit blames Tiger Woods for drunken driver's death

The parents of a drunken driver who died in a car crash last year are suing Tiger Woods. They blame the golfer and his girlfriend for allowing their son to drive home from their Florida restaurant while intoxicated.

Says employees at pro golfer's Florida restaurant over-served 24-year-old male alcoholic

Tiger Woods is being sued by the parents of a drunken driver who died in a car crash last year after leaving the professional golfer's Florida restaurant. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/Associated Press)

The parents of a drunken driver who died in a car crash last year are suing Tiger Woods. They blame the golfer and his girlfriend for allowing their son to drive home from their Florida restaurant while intoxicated.

The wrongful death lawsuit filed Monday in West Palm Beach says Nicholas F. Immesberger was served excessive amounts of alcohol before the Dec. 10 car crash.

Immesberger worked at The Woods restaurant in Jupiter that Woods owns. The golfer's girlfriend, Erica Herman, is general manager.

The lawsuit says Herman recruited Immesberger as a bartender despite knowing that he was an alcoholic. It alleges that the restaurant's employees, managers and owners allowed the 24-year-old man to drive after being over-served alcohol.

"It's very sad," Woods said at the PGA Championship in New York on Tuesday. He said it was a "terrible night, a terrible ending."

Woods' agent hasn't responded to an email seeking comment.

WATCH | Tiger Woods receives Medal of Freedom:

President Donald Trump presents Tiger Woods with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Woods is the fourth golfer to receive the honour. 0:51

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