Reavie makes PGA history with 3 eagles on par-4 holes

Chez Reavie made history with three eagles on par-4 holes during the second round at the Sony Open in Hawaii on Friday.

Canadian Svensson falls 9 shots back after remarkable 1st round

Chez Reavie hits from the 17th tee during the second round of the Sony Open PGA Tour event on Friday. (Matt York/The Associated Press)

Chez Reavie made history with three eagles on par-4 holes during the second round at the Sony Open in Hawaii on Friday.

According to the PGA Tour, nobody had managed the feat since accurate records of such occurrences began in 1983.

The low-key Reavie took the achievement in stride.

"It was strange," the 37-year-old American told Golf Channel at Waialae Country Club in Honolulu, where he trailed leader Matt Kuchar by four shots.

"You hit good shots and you don't expect them to go in. You're always surprised when they drop."

Meanwhile, Canadian rookie Adam Svensson, who opened with a 61 to take a first-round lead Thursday, followed with a 74 to fall nine shots behind American Matt Kuchar.

Reavie, the 2008 Canadian Open champion, wasted no time notching his first eagle, holing out from 100 yards at the 10th, his first hole of the day.

He added his next eagle from 150 yards at the 16th, and as if that was not enough made another from 135 yards at the sixth hole.

He said it was only after the third eagle that he started to wonder if a fourth was in store, and when his wedge approach at his 17th hole flew straight towards the pin he "thought could it really happen again."

His ball stopped six feet short of the cup.

Under the circumstances, he might have had reason to be slightly disappointed with a five-under-par 65, which included a double-bogey, but was not complaining.

"You can't be disappointed out here," he said after signing for a 10-under 130 halfway total.

"This golf course is tough."

With files from CBC Sports

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.