Football

Vick must convey remorse to NFL

Michael Vick's future in the NFL will hinge on him convincing commissioner Roger Goodell that he's truly remorseful for the mistakes he's made.

Suspended NFL quarterback to serve home confinement sentence until July 20

Michael Vick's future in the NFL will hinge on him convincing commissioner Roger Goodell that he's truly remorseful for the mistakes he's made.

"I think that's going to be up to Michael," Goodell said Tuesday. "Michael's going to have to demonstrate to myself and the general public and to a lot of people, did he learn anything from this experience?

"Does he regret what happened? Does he feel that he can be a positive influence going forward? Those are questions that I would like to see when I sit with him."

That was Goodell's message Tuesday, speaking of the quarterback only hours before he was expected to be released from a federal prison in Kansas.

Vick will need not only to say he's sorry, but convince Goodell he means those words if there's any chance his indefinite suspension will be lifted.

Goodell said he hasn't yet determined the process of the athlete's potential reinstatement.

Although he said he hasn't "spent any time on this," the commissioner did acknowledge reaching out in recent weeks to former Indianapolis head coach Tony Dungy, who met with Vick in prison not long ago.

Goodell said he and Dungy have exchanged phone messages, but not spoken.

"I haven't sat down and determined the process," Goodell said. "But I've never been one to shy away from input and from facts that can be helpful in making an ultimate judgment.

"It's always difficult to make judgments about people and where they are. If others can provide some helpful information, then I welcome it."

Will meet with Vick

The commissioner added he'll meet with Vick sometime about his reinstatement, but not before the remainder of his sentence is completed.

Once released from prison, Vick will remain largely in home confinement until July 20.

As part of his sentence, Vick will wear an electronic monitoring device and will be allowed to leave home for work at a $10-an-hour construction job, plus other court-approved events.

Wayne Pacelle, president of the Humane Society of the United States, said the organization wants Vick to work with the group on a program aimed at eradicating dogfighting among urban teens.

Pacelle told The Associated Press he met with Vick at the prison and that the meeting came after Vick's legal team approached the animal-rights group.

Vick was convicted of financing a dogfighting ring and participating in the executions of poorly performing pit bulls and has spent the past 19 months in federal prison.

now