NFL

NFL to let players wear helmet decals to honour victims of systemic racism

The NFL is planning to allow players to have decals on the back of their helmets bearing names of victims of systemic racism and police violence.

Teams would decide who to honour, how to display name in league-wide initiative

Since June, the NFL has been discussing with individual players and their union about how honouring victims of systemic racism and police violence. The plan now is to allow players to wear decals on the back of their helmets with a person’s name. (Streeter Lecka/Getty Images/File)

The NFL is planning to allow players to have decals on the back of their helmets bearing names of victims of systemic racism and police violence.

The league has been in talks with individual players and their union since June about somehow honouring such victims. The initiative will be done leaguewide, with each team deciding who it will honour and how to display the names.

Unlike the NBA, which is allowing players to wear slogans on their jerseys, the NFL will stick to names once a final agreement has been reached with the players' association. The program will continue for the entire season.

This initiative is something of a breakthrough because the league has not allowed such messaging, except for during its October NFL Crucial Catch program in conjunction with the fight against breast cancer, and in its November salutes to the military. Players also have been allowed to represent a cause on their cleats one weekend per season.

But a 17-week campaign such as the one being planned is something new for the NFL.

A list of names for use on the helmet decals is being put together by the league and the NFLPA. Players have been encouraged to provide those names.

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