NFL

Reporter clarifies after saying Colin Kaepernick would stand for anthem if signed by NFL club

A CBS reporter has clarified his televised report saying quarterback Colin Kaepernick told him he would stand during the national anthem if he played in the NFL again, saying he didn't discuss the issue directly with the player.

Former 49ers QB began a protest movement by kneeling last season

Colin Kaepernick was at the centre of another kneeling-standing controversy Sunday. A CBS reporter originally said that the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback would stand if hired again by an NFL team, but the reporter later clarified he never actually spoke to Kaepernick. (Marcio Jose Sanchez/The Associated Press)

A CBS reporter has clarified his televised report saying quarterback Colin Kaepernick told him he would stand during the national anthem if he played in the NFL again, saying he didn't discuss the issue with the player when they spoke.

Jason La Canfora said in a series of tweets on Sunday that he was relaying previous reporting about Kaepernick and did not ask whether the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback would sit or stand during the anthem.

The reversal came after anchor James Brown asked La Canfora on The NFL Today: "And kneeling, he said?"

La Canfora responded: "He's not planning on kneeling. He's going to donate all his jersey sales and he's planning on standing for the anthem if given the opportunity, J.B."

La Canfora tweeted later that he does not know what Kaepernick would do during the anthem.

Relying on unnamed sources, ESPN reported in March that Kaepernick would stand during the anthem if he played again. But Kaepernick has not spoken publicly about what he would do.

Kaepernick seemingly responded to the controversial report with a tweet Sunday afternoon. He was also retweeting others who were slamming the reporter over the misinformation.

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