NFL

Canadian anthem singer goes back on decision to kneel at Seahawks game

Arielle Tuliao had previously said that she planned to kneel after performing the Canadian national anthem, with the idea of supporting protesting NFL players who are making a statement about civil rights by sitting or taking a knee during the American anthem, but ultimately did not.

Vancouver woman had plans of doing so in support of protesting NFL players

Arielle Tuliao had previously said she planned to kneel after performing the Canadian national anthem to support protesting NFL players. (Elaine Thompson/Associated Press)

Vancouver woman invited to sing O Canada before a Seahawks game in Seattle decided to not take a knee after her performance.

Arielle Tuliao had previously said that she planned to kneel after performing the Canadian national anthem, with the idea of supporting protesting NFL players who are making a statement about civil rights by sitting or taking a knee during the American anthem, but ultimately did not.

Nine Seahawks players sat on the bench during the playing of the Star-Spangled Banner before Sunday night's game against Indianapolis. Defensive end Michael Bennett continued his stance of sitting during the anthem, but was joined by the entire Seahawks defensive line and linebacker Michael Wilhoite.

Tuliao had wrestled with how she would respond as players kneeled, sat or locked arms during the anthems to protest police brutality against African-Americans and President Donald Trump's portrayal of their stance as unpatriotic.

"How do I take a stand without bringing unnecessary drama to my country? I want to honour the Seahawks for celebrating their true north fans but at the same time it's my job to also stand up for [their] rights, not just as American citizens, but as humans," said Tuliao in an interview with The Canadian Press on Friday.

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